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Echo Evangelique

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7:30pm Bible Study
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8:30am Bible Study
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The Majesty and the Holiness of God

Text: Isaiah 6:1-8

 

Key concepts:

·       Holiness and majesty are innate to God

·       Holiness means to be distinct and set apart for God

·       Majesty is a royal attribute

·       God transcends our circumstances and limitations

·       We are to look upon His holiness and majesty with reverence and praise

 

The theme of the holiness of God presented in this text show God in a way that will cause you to be transformed and to glorify Him. When one is talking about the majesty of GOD, he is contemplating a different plane where one is forced to amass words and come up with a list of epithets and qualifiers that wind up being insufficient and limited. You enter into the domain of the ineffable or indescribable. One is better able to explain GOD’s majesty by its effect upon you. Indeed, the majesty of God is in class of its own and is not easily defined. There are three basic concepts on how the majesty of God is proclaimed and revealed, explained and applied.           

Theologians throughout the ages have strived to capture what the bible teaches in regard to the majesty of God. They’ve come up with a list of words that explains the majesty of God. The group of words that the majesty of God includes dignity, holiness, authority, power, greatness, height, magnificence, splendor and glory. The effects of God’s majesty upon human beings is meant to provoke fear, reverence, astonishment, admiration, adoration and praise. Moses for example, taking about the majesty of God declare in Exodus 15:7 (see also vs 11) that God’s majesty overwhelms and consumes His enemies. Job also proclaimed that the majesty of God is great, so did David (Ps 8:1); the palms, altogether, are a display of the majesty of God. These different perspectives allow us to glimpse facets of the majesty of God. Isaiah in his 6th chapter offers a more revealing display of the majesty of God. The chapter begins with the announcement of death of King Uzziah, the long-lived mighty leader of Israel died who did what was right in the sigh of the Lord at the start of his rule. At the end of Uzziah’s reign however, he became arrogant and whose life ended as a tragic Shakespearean villain. Uzziah came to power at the age of sixteen and reigned for fifty-two years; under his leadership the nation of Israel prospered significantly both politically, financially and militarily. As long as Uzziah obeyed God, he was blessed with said prosperity and were the envy of nations. However, toward the end of his life he became prideful and sought to usurp the right of the priest to offer incense to God. His behavior horrified the priests who sent one of them to plead with the king to refrain from such offense. Instead of repenting, the king became upset and refused to back down; at which point God struck him with leprosy and the king died in shame, isolation and disgrace. Right away, the nation’s enemies sought to subdue them in chaos and fear. The list of issues grew long for the people abandoned their God to seek after pleasure, lacking in reverence and despising glory of the holy one of Israel. In the midst of this distressing time, Isaiah is given the vison of the King of hosts upon His majestic, glorious throne. The message was clear, though their beloved Uzziah was dead leaving his nation to face a very disquieting time; the Lord of lords is still alive and ruling. Beyond the chaos and apprehension, Isaiah saw The Lord God the creator, the lord of order in all His sovereign authority. Isaiah saw beyond the kingdom of visibility to glimpse the majesty of God. There is a song that expresses this well, “immortal, invisible, God the only wise one, in an invisible light hidden from us, more blessed and glorious, the Ancient of Days, almighty, victorious, we praise your great name.”

            Majesty is an attribute that is unique to the king, it is a royal characteristic (1 Chron. 29:10-13). We see that God the true king of Israel is alive after the earthly king’s death. It is appointed for all men to died once and return to the dust, but God is God from eternity to eternity; he is self-existent and immutable throughout the ages. His authority cannot be commandeered by another. He holds our lives in His hands and there is none like Him. We don’t allow God to have authority in our lives, we are in his creature and thus his authority is legit; however, once we recognize that authority we are to bow down and surrender our lives to Him. His throne is transcendent, superior in power and authority. His government controls all other governments. He is the supreme Lord.  

Like Isaiah, we need a vision of God so that we can know his authority, submit and obey accordingly. God is omnipotent, there is none who sits above him, nor authority beyond His, nor power to resist His will. The might and splendor of royalty used to be measured the extend of the train of their royal garments. Isaiah tells us that the train of God’s robe filled the temple; no other king can compare. God is a God a reverence, the seraphim prove this by covering their eyes and feet.  We need such a vision of God before we can understand the Gospel and before we can serve Him. What one understands will dictate one’s behavior.  Let us do what all other beings who’s been touched by the majesty of God do, with reverence and humility let us proclaim with seraphim “holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts. The whole earth is filled with His glory.” And with all other creatures, let us cry “to Him who sits on the throne be and to the Lamb of God be power, wisdom, riches, the praise and glory forever and ever. Amen”

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Roslindale, MA 02131
Phone: 617-323-3107
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